Is the SORP FRS 102 working for you?

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May 5, 2016 at 17:46

On the 4th May the Charity Commission for England and Wales and the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR) published a research consultation on charities Statement of Recommended Practice (SORP) FRS 102.

Lessons to take away from Kids Company report

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February 1, 2016 at 11:34

The Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee (PACAC) report on the failure of Kids Company has been released. The report has a number of lessons that the charity sector needs to learn, this blog post outlines some of the main points that we should take away from a finance perspective.

What did the Romans ever know about data protection?

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January 19, 2016 at 17:33

As usual, quite a lot. Caesar famously used his cipher device to protect important and sensitive military data among his generals. So what can we learn from the famous Roman?

What Regulation, Who Pays? Public Opinion and Charity Regulation

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January 13, 2016 at 17:48

CFG has today published a new report, What Regulation, Who Pays? Public Opinion and Charity Regulation. The research was conducted by Dr Eddy Hogg from the Centre for Philanthropy at the University of Kent. The aim of the research was to explore in detail the public attitude to charity regulation, and who they think should foot the bill for that regulation.

Caron’s comment: can profit and social change mix?

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March 9, 2015 at 15:57

I recently attended an interesting seminar on social ventures. The presenters argued that the legal construct of a venture should be irrelevant, and that it was the organisation’s ability to bring about social change that mattered. Time constraints prevented a detailed exploration of some of these fascinating avenues, so I’ve been reflecting on them ever since. The one that particularly stuck with me was the statement that if you can get corporates’ strength focused on social good, they are “arguably the best vehicle for social change because of their often plentiful resources and their ability to innovate”. Businesses as a […]

Pressure on charity campaigning is not going to go away

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February 27, 2015 at 11:18

This week Weber Shandwick held a debate on the future of charity campaigning which saw a panel of eminent speakers* discuss the Lobbying Act and other issues in the run up to the election. As reported by the sector press, the debate was intense and the vast majority of charities in the room believed that the sector was coming under undue pressure from politicians and regulators. However, on the back of this debate, I think there is a simple truth that charities need to take on board in the run up to the election: politicians are jealous of the influence […]

Audits, thresholds and transparency

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January 30, 2015 at 11:34

Last week, the Cabinet Office consultation on the future of the audit threshold for charities concluded. Charity Finance Group, in partnership with NCVO, responded to the consultation on behalf of members. Audits are an important part of the regulatory landscape for charities, and the government has proposed lifting the threshold for which charities have to have their accounts audited from £500,000 to £1m. We have supported this move, in line with responses from members to a previous consultation which proposed lifting the audit threshold. For many small and medium sized charities, audit costs can be significant and may not be […]

Are charities losing their voice?

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July 24, 2014 at 18:52

  The campaigning role of charities has stayed firmly in the public spotlight for the last twelve months and appears to be gaining traction as we head towards the General Election. It first raised eyebrows last year when the sector expressed significant concerns about the then coined ‘Gagging Bill’ – now Lobbying Act. Calls came from the Public Administration Select Committee for charities to declare their campaigning spend on their Annual Return (a recent Charity Commission consultation), various noises have been made about whether charities in receipt of public funds should campaign at all and most recently, there have been […]

Managing in a Downturn Report Reflections….

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April 11, 2014 at 15:08

Yesterday saw the launch of the seventh ‘Managing in Downturn’ report – a survey series that we have run in partnership with the Institute of Fundraising and PwC since the start of the economic downturn in 2008. The launch event itself was a lively affair with reflections of the findings from: Andrew Sentance, PwC’s Chief Economist; Mark Astarita, the IoF Chair; and our own Jane Tully. Highlights included Andrew Sentance’s weather map of the global economic outlook for 2014 (sunny intervals for the UK!) and Mark Astarita’s optimism that the baby boomer generation’s large capital assets will have significant implications […]

Why the role of the charity regulator matters – a look to Ireland

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January 20, 2014 at 13:27

I’ve been paying close attention to the unravelling story around one of Ireland’s leading charities in recent months. Breaking in the run up to Christmas, when the seasonal appeals were at their height, the ‘scandal’ (it’s had all the hallmarks of a classic Irish scandal!) has rocked the voluntary sector there, and hit trust and confidence in the worst of ways.  As happened on a smaller scale in the UK last summer, questions around executive pay and pay-offs are threatening to undermine public donations to charity. The main charity in the spotlight is the Central Remedial Clinic in Dublin, a non-residential […]