Things to take from the NCVO Civil Society Almanac 2016

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April 15, 2016 at 17:27

Wisden…Whitakers…Old Farmer’s…all  great Almanacs, but one of the most valuable statistical compendiums has to be the NCVO Civil Society Almanac, upon which so many of us in the sector depend for insight.

Budget Focus: What was hidden in the numbers for charities?

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March 17, 2016 at 17:48

The Office for Budget Responsibility’s Economic and Fiscal Outlook is where the real detail of the Budget resides. What was hidden in the numbers for charities this time around? Here are three things that we should take away.

A ‘straightjacket’ Budget: Pay, Tax Avoidance, Welfare and Assets

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March 11, 2016 at 09:01

Next week the Chancellor has to stand up and deliver his 8th Budget and it promises to be an interesting affair. If the last Spending Review saw the Chancellor play Father Christmas, this time the Chancellor may need to tap into his Dickensian side and summon up his inner Scrooge. My colleague, Anjelica Finnegan, has laid out in detail the issues concerning charities. But what hints do the economics data give us for what the Chancellor may do next Wednesday?

Charities need to stand up for Gift Aid, or risk losing it

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March 4, 2016 at 17:30

Today we have seen another ‘report’ (see Civil Society and Third Sector) on charities by the True and Fair Foundation. There isn’t any point dwelling on the report itself, but it is a  reminder that charities need to do more to explain and defend tax reliefs, such as Gift Aid.

Affinity Deals: What do you need to know?

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February 5, 2016 at 13:57

Yesterday saw a story on the front page The Sun about an affinity deal between Age UK and E.on. While this blog post doesn’t focus on the details of this story, it has raised some issues that charities need to be aware of . I seek to explain affinity deals and what charities need to consider when deciding whether to enter these arrangements.

Lessons to take away from Kids Company report

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February 1, 2016 at 11:34

The Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee (PACAC) report on the failure of Kids Company has been released. The report has a number of lessons that the charity sector needs to learn, this blog post outlines some of the main points that we should take away from a finance perspective.

What’s in local government’s Christmas stocking?

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December 17, 2015 at 16:56

It’s Christmas and the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government has unveiled the government’s provisional Local Government Finance Settlement for 2016-17. The Local Government Finance Settlement is effectively a ‘Local Government Budget’ for the year and its provisional nature means it is open for consultation. Overall, this year’s stocking was filled with a combination of lumps of coals and a couple of potentially tasty oranges (ho, ho, ho). Here are the headlines that charities need to know.

What does the economic data mean for charities?

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November 26, 2015 at 11:09

The Spending Review gets all the attention, but the most important document in many ways is the Economic and Fiscal Outlook by the Office of Budget Responsibility. This sets out the framework that the Chancellor is able to make his decisions and tells us a lot about the impact of the choices that he has made. The full document is nearly 250 pages – but we at CFG have gone through it for you to pull out the key statistics that will impact on the sector.

Banking and Payment Systems: Invisible Enables for Charities

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November 24, 2015 at 14:35

Charity Finance Group has launched a sector-wide consultation on banking and payment systems. But why are we doing this and how can you help?

Just one thing, Sir John…

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November 18, 2015 at 15:32

Last week I was delighted to attend NCVO’s Annual Hinton Lecture which saw an excellent speech from former Prime Minister, Sir John Major. Sir John touched on a number of subjects, far too many to consider in one blog post, and you can read the speech here or listen to it here. However one thing that struck me was Sir John’s answer in the Q&A after the speech around the need for investment in preventative services but that the public sector could not be expected to provide this in the coming years.